Homework


St Peter's approach to the setting of homework is based on extensive educational research about the quality and frequency of homework. By following these recommendations we aim to ensure that all students adopt good home learning routines and reinforce and consolidate learning undertaken in the classroom. 

 

Aims of Homework setting at St Peter's

To ensure homework is as effective as possible and makes a positive difference to student outcomes homework should:

  1. Enable learners to practise and consolidate basic skills and learning habits from the taught curriculum
  2. Be directly connected to a specific aspect of learning, linked to the curriculum
  3. Provide different levels of challenge / choice
  4. Have a clear purpose that identifies the specific area that homework will develop (e.g. consolidation of a certain skill, to improve understanding, to research a topic prior to the lesson…)
  5. Be high quality activities that receive timely feedback
  6. Have active involvement from the teacher, even when technology is involved such as online activities, tests or research
  7. Be completed autonomously by students, with appropriate support from parents and carers
  8. Encourage students, parents and carers to discuss their education together at home
  9. Allow students adequate time to pursue out-of school learning



HOW WILL WE ACHIEVE THESE AIMS?

In order to meet the requirements above, the type of homework, the frequency with which it is set and the feedback provided to students will all play an important part in making homework a valuable part of curriculum provision. To view the full Homework policy and learn more about the research behind our approaches, please download it from the 'downloads' link at the bottom of the page.

Types of Homework

Short Task-Focused Homework

  • Learning vocabulary in Modern Foreign Languages
  • Consolidation of Maths through short tests / questions
  • Resourcing ready for the next lesson
  • Reading for pleasure or reading a section of a core text
  • Reviewing notes made in class
  • Using web-based learning resources (e.g. GCSE Pod, My Maths…)



Focused Project Homework

  • Activities that take more than one week to complete, directly related to learning in class
  • History project exploring World War 1 trenches – building a model of a trench
  • Art project analysing the work of focussed artists to better understand the cultural influences as well as how it was created
  • Keeping a food diary for Design & Technology to examine modern lifestyles and diet
  • Creating a model of a cell for Science – by any means

Recording Homework

Students should record their homework in their school planner. It is a student’s responsibility to make sure the homework is accurately recorded.

Homework Club

There is a weekly homework club at lunchtimes that supports learners in the completion of their homework. Students have access to a range of computers as well as support staff who are on hand.

Feedback on completed Homework

  • Completion of homework is regularly monitored by tutors and teachers.
  • Students should write clearly at the end of each homework activity how long they spent completing it.
  • Regular shorter homework activities will receive timely feedback (see below). When possible this will be within one week of completion and hand in.
  • Project-based homework will be collected on the due date, with timely feedback provided which values the student and their learning.
  • Staff are encouraged to use lesson time to celebrate successful homework contributions and make connections between the work and the topics learnt in class.
     

Types of Feedback

Oral Feedback

This works best as a formative conversation about learning either with peers or with the teacher. Such a conversation will promote a growth mindset and curious questions that will enable the learner to progress their learning.


Written Feedback

This works best in exactly the same way as oral feedback. Please refer to the Assessment, Marking & Feedback policy for detailed guidance on the best ways to maximise progress through feedback.


Self-Feedback

For this to be successful students need to be fully aware of the learning intentions and also the success criteria for the activity. It is best used when well supported and structured by the classroom teacher. This involves using the learning habit language and a range of techniques that are strategically used to enable students to take increasing responsibility for their learning and progress.


Peer-Feedback

This works in the same way as for self-feedback. Strong peer-feedback can form a solid basis for self-feedback.

Frequency of Homework

Allowing flexibility for teachers to set homework ensures that homework activities are higher quality, purposeful and relevant to curriculum provision.
 

“The quality of homework is more important than the quantity.” 

The Education Endowment Foundation


Setting of homework is monitored by Tutors and Subject Learning Leaders during tutor time, learning walks and through work scrutiny. In addition Heads of Year and Senior Leaders monitor the setting of homework periodically during lesson visits and lesson observations. 


The frequency with which homework is set and the amount varies according to the curriculum hours of subject areas. The following therefore is a guide as to how often, and how much homework each subject is expected to set.



Core subjects - English, Maths, Science in years 7 & 8

The average amount of homework we would anticipate from the core subjects would be four times within each half term. Each homework piece should be planned to take approximately half an hour to complete. It is possible to set fewer, longer homework tasks in the form of a focused project but the overall time allocation would be the same. 

In English, we place huge value on wide reading, and expect students to read at home as a significant part of their homework.



Foundation Subjects – MFL in years 7 & 8

The average amount of homework we would anticipate from Modern Foreign Languages would be four times within each half term. Each homework piece should be planned to take approximately half an hour to complete. It is possible to set fewer, longer homework tasks in the form of a focused project but the overall time allocation should be the same.


All other Foundation subjects in years 7 & 8 (excluding Citizenship, PSHE& Mental Health and Well-Being and PE) 

Homework should be set twice within each half term. Each homework piece should be planned to take approximately half an hour to complete. It is possible to set fewer, longer homework tasks in the form of a focused project but the overall time allocation should be the same. Longer project work is encouraged in the foundation subjects wherever possible.


Homework in years 9, 10 & 11

The homework load in years 9, 10 and 11 will vary depending on the course a student is following. The majority of students should expect to do between four and five hours a week and this may include revision as well as use of workshops and preparation for controlled assessments done in school time. Each GCSE-equivalent subject should set homework at least fortnightly, each piece taking approximately one hour to complete.

Non Completion of Homework

Non-completion of homework may impact on grades, references and opportunities to access future courses as well as current setting arrangements.

Failure to complete homework for the agreed deadline will usually be dealt with by the professional judgement of the classroom teacher in the first instance. The teacher may negotiate an extended deadline or request that the work is completed at a departmental detention. It is the responsibility of each student to ensure that homework tasks are completed and handed in on time.

Downloads

Page Downloads Date  
Homework Policy 04th Feb 2020 Download